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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
was an enthusiastic collector out of baltimore. from there, the trail goes cold. >> the whereabouts have been unknown. >> reporter: it did show up in a flea market in the shenandoah valley. it got the attention of one of the browsers there, though not for the art itself. >> i originally bought it for the frame. >> reporter: she doesn't want her identity revealed but she said she's never gone to an estate sale and she doesn't stalk flea markets. she thought the best she would get out of this is a nice frame. >> i started ripping it apart. and i was like, maybe i should wait. >> reporter: her mother urged her to get it appraised. that picture did have the artist's name on the frame. the folks here have seen that sort of thing before. >> usually when you see that, you think, okay, this is a fake. because they're trying to say it's a renoir. >> reporter: this one had all the features of the real thing. features that a trained eye can easily spot. >> straight away, it just looked right. it's the color, it's the vibrant color, the pinks and purples. and he's known for his rapid brush strokes. >> we have it
dermtelling at the johns hopkins -- dermatology at the johns hopkins center in baltimore. ten years ago he never saw skin cancer in a child. now he sees a few cases a year. >> commensurate with the adult epidemic in skin cancer, children not far behind. clearly, people are getting more sun exposure. and kids are getting tons of sun exposure, particularly early in life. >> reporter: dr. cohen says it's not just melanoma that's on the rise, he's seeing more incidents of less serious basal and squ m squaumous cell cancer, as well. he believes genetics and more exposure to ultraviolet light are factors. >> i think some of the problem in children under the age of 12 is that we don't understand what it means for them lifelong. >> reporter: for example, the chance of recurrence after a melanoma be as high as 50%. but dr. cohen worries that in a child who has years and years left to live, that chance could be much higher. that's why melissa says she's constantly checking all of her children's skin. >> so many people don't think kids are going to get skin cancer. it doesn't discriminate, and it do
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)

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